Winter Weather Driving Tips

  • DECEMBER 1ST, 2019

    Severe weather can be both frightening and dangerous for travelers. Winter storms, bad weather and sloppy road conditions are a factor in nearly half a million crashes and more than 2,000 road deaths every winter, according to research by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Drivers should know the safety rules for dealing with winter road emergencies. Below you will find tips for cold weather driving in the winter months:

    Cold/Snow Weather Driving Tips

    • Keep a bundle of cold-weather gear in your car, such as extra food and water, warm clothing, a flashlight, a glass scraper, blankets, medications, and more.
    • Make certain your tires are properly inflated and have plenty of tread.
    • Keep at least half a tank of fuel in your vehicle at all times.
    • Brush your car off entirely including all windows, headlights, taillights and license plates.
    • Make sure your headlights are on during low visability weather.
    • Never warm up a vehicle in an enclosed area, such as a garage.
    • Do not use cruise control when driving on any slippery surface, such as on ice and snow.

    Tips for Driving in the Snow

    • Stay home. Only go out if necessary. Even if you can drive well in bad weather, it’s better to avoid taking unnecessary risks by venturing out.
    • Drive slowly. Always adjust your speed down to account for lower traction when driving on snow or ice.
    • Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Apply the gas slowly to regain traction and avoid skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry and take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
    • Increase your following distance to five to six seconds. This increased margin of safety will provide the longer distance needed if you have to stop.
    • Know your brakes. Whether you have antilock brakes or not, keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
    • Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
    • Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads will just make your wheels spin. Try to get a little inertia going before you reach the hill and let that inertia carry you to the top. As you reach the crest of the hill, reduce your speed and proceed downhill slowly.
    • Don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.

NYS Junior Driver's

  • OCTOBER 1ST, 2019

    As student driver's start obtaining their driver's license it is important to remember that unless a student has taken driver's education or they are 18 years or older they will have a Class DJ License meaning student's will be operating under certain restrictions. Below you will find the restrictions for a person who holds a junior driver's license. 

    Upstate New York junior driver license restrictions

    DAYTIME DRIVING (5 AM to 9 PM)

    If you have a junior license (Class DJ, MJ or DJ/MJ), you may drive in upstate New York

    • without a supervising driver between the hours of 5 AM and 9 PM
    • there be no more than one passenger under age 21 unless the passengers are members of your immediate family. You can have more than one passenger under age 21 only if your supervising driver is your licensed parent, guardian, person in a position of "in loco parentis," driver education teacher or driving school instructor
    • every passenger wear a seat belt, one seat belt per person
    • all children under age four ride in federally-approved child safety seat
      • if the child is more than 40 pounds in weight, they must use a proper child restraint system such as a booster seat
      • until their 8th birthday, children must use a proper child restraint system
      • children more than four feet nine inches tall are allowed to use a seat belt and shoulder harness.

    NIGHTTIME DRIVING (9 PM to 5 AM)

    Between the hours of 9 PM and 5 AM,  you may drive without a supervising driver only directly between your home and

    • your employment (you must carry appropriate proof of employment) 1  
    • a school course 2  

    In any circumstance other than those described above, you may drive between the hours of 9 PM and 5 AM only under the direct supervision of your

    •  parent
    • guardian 3  
    • a person "in loco parentis" 4 
    • driver education teacher or a driving school instructor

    For driving between 9 PM and 5 AM, it is also required that

    • the person who supervises your driving be at least age 21 and have a license valid for the vehicle you are driving
    • the only passenger in the front seat be your supervising driver
    • there be no more than one passenger under age 21 unless the passengers are members of your immediate family. You can have more than one passenger under age 21 only if your supervising driver is your licensed parent, guardian, person in a position of "in loco parentis," driver education teacher or driving school instructor
    • every passenger wear a seat belt, one seat belt per person
    • all children under age four ride in federally-approved child safety seat
      • if the child is more than 40 pounds in weight, they must use a proper child restraint system such as a booster seat
      • until their 8th birthday, children must use a proper child restraint system
      • children more than four feet nine inches tall are allowed to use a seat belt and shoulder harness

    What are the penalties for traffic violations as a junior driver?

    Your junior permit, license, or privileges will be suspended for 60 days if you are convicted of one serious traffic violation or two other violations that were committed while you held a junior permit or license.

    Your junior permit, license, or privileges will be revoked for 60 days if you are convicted of one serious traffic violation or two other violations within the first six months after your permit, license or privileges are restored after a suspension or revocation.

    A "serious traffic violation" is normally a violation that carries three or more driver violation points.

    What are the penalties for conviction of cell phone use or texting as a junior driver?

    If you have a Class DJ or MJ driver license or learner permit, the first conviction of a cell phone use or texting violation will result in a suspension of your driver license or permit for 60 days. (For texting/cell phone violations committed between July 1, 2013 and October 31, 2014)

     A second conviction within six months will result in

    • a revocation of at least 6 months of a probationary license, or
    • a revocation of at least 60 days for a Class DJ or MJ driver license or learner permit

    Effective November 1, 2014, the first conviction of a cell phone use or texting violation will result in a suspension of the driver license or permit for 120 days.

    A second conviction within six months of the restoration of the license or permit (after the 120 day suspension is terminated) will result in

    • a revocation of at least one year of a probationary license, or

    • a revocation of at least one year for a Class DJ or MJ driver license or learner permit

     

    1"employment" means a place of business at which you are paid to work on a regularly scheduled basis. You may NOT drive during work or as part of your work duties, such as for deliveries. Driver must also have in their possession a filled out Certificate of Employment (PDF) (MV-58A).

    2"school course" means instruction, education or training that is licensed or approved by a state agency or department, or training conducted by the U.S. Armed Forces. The term "school course" does NOT include extracurricular activities, sports or social events for which no scholastic credits are given.

    3"guardian" means a person who has, on a regular and extended basis, assumed the character of your parent and is discharging parental duties as the result of the death, disability, or absence of your natural parent.

    4"in loco parentis" means a person who has, on a regular and extended basis, assumed the character of your parent and is discharging parental duties as a result of the death, disability, or absence of your natural parent.


Student Driving on Campus

  • SEPTEMBER 3RD, 2019

    WELCOME BACK TO SCHOOL ALL STUDENTS, STAFF AND TEACHERS!! Just a friendly reminder that the speed limit on Bulldog Blvd and Memorial Drive is 25mph along with a section of Memorial Drive that is 15mph. Please use caution while navigating the campus as there have been several updates as well as construction that is still on going.  When you are entering the parking lots please use caution as students and staff members are walking through the lot into the building.  Uniformed Traffic Tickets will be issued accordingly if the laws are not followed.  According to the Livonia Central School District Code of Conduct, a student can be suspended from driving privileges upon school grounds for a designated amount of time as a disciplinary penalty. 


GRADUATION PARTY REMINDER

  • AN OPEN LETTER TO PARENTS AT GRADUATION TIME

    Parents,

    In this time of year for graduation parties and social gatherings celebrating the achievements of our students, the Livingston County Sheriff’s Office would like to take a moment to pass along some reminders for a safe gathering.

    The Livingston County Sheriff’s Office wants to remind parents the dangers that come with underage drinking and resources for help. Citizens are able to call with confidential information anytime involving crimes in Livingston County, such as providing alcohol to minors. Anyone wanting to report information or provide tips are urged to call the Sheriff’s Office at 585-243-7100 or go to the Sheriff’s Office Website: www.livingstoncounty.us/sheriff Scroll down the toolbar on the left side of the Homepage to “Take Action” then click on “Tip Line”. You may remain anonymous, however if you are willing to identify yourself, the information will remain confidential and made only available to Sheriff's personal.

    You, as a role model, are the most influential person in your child’s life. It is important that you know that as a parent you cannot give alcohol or allow anyone under 21 to remain in your home or on your property while possessing or consuming alcohol. Make sure you communicate with your child; know your child’s friends and their parents; don’t be afraid to ask questions and check your child’s room and belongings – knowledge is power. Talk to your teen before any party – let them know that they can always call you if they need you or call 911.

    We want all students and parents alike to celebrate their achievements but we also want to ensure it is a safe season for all.

    If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to call us at the Livingston County Sheriff’s Office and we will be more than happy to help in any way we can.

     

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Last Modified on December 18, 2019